Tinius Digest October 2021

Tinius Digest

Tinius Digest report on changes, trends and developments within the media business at large. These are our key findings from last month.

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Insight October 2021

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Many seniors unfamiliar with content marketing

A report from the Norwegian Media Authority shows that Norwegians over the age of 60 have little knowledge of concepts such as content marketing and algorithms.

Download the report.

Three main findings:

1

Unfamiliar term

A total of 54 percent of Norwegians between 60 and 79 say that they have never heard of content marketing. Another 12 percent have heard of the term but say they don’t understand what it is. Among Norwegians over the age of 80, only 18 percent understand what content marketing is.

2

Less competent

The seniors in the study consider themselves less competent than the national average to handle disinformation and fake news online. Only one in ten over 80 years, and 16 percent aged 60–79, consider themselves highly competent at handling disinformation. The national average is 30 percent.

3

Commercial pressure

Most seniors state that they have less experience than the national average with various forms of commercial pressure online, such as companies collecting personal data about them. They also regularly pay for digital services they thought they had terminated.

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Researchers: Urgent to identify the dangers of artificial intelligence

A new report on artificial intelligence means it is urgent to identify and understand the potential adverse effects of the technology.

The report looks at the progress of artificial intelligence between 2016 and 2021 – and is based on a study panel consisting of 17 scientists and experts.

Download the report.

Three main findings:

1

Significant progress

There has been significant progress in artificial intelligence over the past five years, and the use of this technology is spreading to new areas in society.

2

Hidden consequences

The report believes there’s no reason to paint a dystopian picture of the future but warns us against hidden negative consequences. Now the progress is happening so fast that it is urgent to identify potential negative effects.

3

Regulation needed

Identified negative consequences should be regulated to a greater extent and managed in a closer collaboration between the government, academia and the technology industry.

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69 percent of young Danes receive news through social media

The Danish Ministry of Culture has published its annual report on internet and social media usage in Denmark.

Download the report.

Four main findings:

1

Above the average

69 percent of Danes between the age of 15 and 24 get their news from social media. This is far above the average in Denmark, which is 42 percent.

2

Many different profiles

The average Dane has a profile on four social media. The youngest (19-24 years old) has got an average of six profiles on social media, and Danes between 55-77 have got an average of three profiles.

 

3

Facebook dominating

95 percent of Danes using social media have got a profile on a platform owned by Facebook. The nearest competitors are Snapchat (46 %), YouTube owned by Google (44%) and LinkedIn owned by Microsoft (43%).

4

Almost four hours daily

The average Dane is online on their smartphone 224 minutes per week (three hours and 44 minutes). The youngest spend the most time online (351 minutes), but the time use has declined by 35 minutes from 2019 to 2020.

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74 percent of Swedish children are on social media

A report from the State Media Council in Sweden on media habits among Swedish children/teens between 9 and 18 years shows that the daily use of social media among Swedish children has increased by 13 percent since 2019.

Download the report.

Five main findings:

1

48 percent daily users

74 percent of Swedish children between 9 and 12 years are on social media – close to half (48%) use social media every day.

2

Girls more active users

The use of social media among children (9-12 years) is most common amongst girls, where 57 percent are daily on social media. As for boys, the share is 39 percent.

3

Increasing usage

54 percent of 18-year-old women use social media for more than three hours every day. This is an increase of 12 percent since 2018.

4

Unwanted attention

31 percent of Swedish girls between 13 and 16 have been asked to send nudes online. 14 percent state that they have received pressure to perform “something sexual” online.

5

Self-aware

The share of 17-18 year-olds who think they use too much time on their mobile has increased from 46 percent to 56 percent since 2018.

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Internet freedom continues to decline for the 11th year in a row

Freedom House has published its annual report ‘Freedom on the net’. The report analyses internet freedom in 70 countries, which collectively inhabit 88 percent of the world’s net users. More than 80 analysts and councilors have contributed to this year’s report.

Download the report.

Four main findings:

1

Restricted rights

Digital rights have been restricted in 30 countries for the past year, while only 18 got more freedom online.

2

Winners and losers

The greatest deteriorations were documented in Myanmar, Belarus and Uganda. China and Iran were at the bottom of the list. The biggest winners are Ecuador and Gambia.

3

20 percent is US-based

Out of all the companies lobbying the EU on digital policy, 20 percent are US-based, though this number is likely even higher. Less than one percent have head offices in China or Hong Kong. This implies Chinese firms have so far not invested in EU lobbying quite as heavily as their US counterparts. 

4

Blocking social media

21 countries have blocked their inhabitants’ access to social media the past year.

5

Iceland #1

Of the Nordic countries, only Iceland is represented on the list. And as it should be: Iceland tops the list as the country with the most online freedom of the 70 countries selected.

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Local newspapers crucial for reducing corporate misconduct

A study from Harvard Business School, University of California San Diego and Rotterdam School of Management has examined the effect of local newspaper closures on facility-level misconduct.

Download the study.

Three main findings:

1

Important monitor

The results provide evidence that local newspapers are an important monitor of firms’ misconduct. Local newspaper closures increase penalties by 15.2 percent and violations by 1.1 percent at the facility level.

2

Significant increase

The increase in penalties for the average facility represents approximately 0.95% of facility-level sales. Given that the average newspaper closure affects 41.1 facilities in our sample, the closure of a local newspaper increases penalties by approximately $1,235,839 over three years. 

3

Dark figures

The estimates in the study rely on detected violations, as undetected misconduct is unobservable. The dark figures are probably significant.

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